In Appreciation of Life

Today I look back on my journey realizing how grateful I am for my life. I am only able to say this because I built a relationship with God early when I had mountains of adversity to overcome. It wasn’t mine, rather the journey of my parents that I was born into. But that was the path that I was destined to take so I would seek God, which taught me to understand God’s love, protection, power, grace, and mercy. As time went on, I worked to build that relationship as there was so much more to understand, value, and appreciate.

Years later, when I thought that my relationship with God would protect me from harm, I had yet another bout with adversity that threatened my existence and hurled fear into my children. Still, I reminded my children that God knew I was obedient and without fear, but it was time for me to learn another lesson. I trusted the outcome of a lengthy brain surgery on multiple aneurysms with complete certainty because God told me to get it done. When I opened my eyes, I couldn’t do anything but smile at the sight of my family in front of me. I would not ever go against what God told me for the options that man tried to reason with me. I had yet another level of appreciation for life and a testimony. The recovery took time and was a battle in itself, but I needed to fight. I wanted to fight because I had so much more to do.

People fight every day; children fight every minute for life, but sometimes, we don’t win. When we do, the appreciation is so much greater than what it ever could have been because we have the propensity to take family, friends, health, material things, and God for granted.

Today, I celebrate having five more years of service to God in appreciation of my life. I learned the value of each breath I take, everything I see, and the feel of sand beneath my feet. I am grateful for those who love me as it, too, is a gift.

www.MaralaScott.com

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Without Judgment

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Most of the time we think we know people but is our judgment an accurate and fair assessment? Just because it’s a family member, friend, co-worker, or someone you routinely come in contact with it doesn’t mean you know what their reality is. People have problems or situations that they don’t share. If they do, it may not be the complete version. Some people keep their personal life private; they don’t believe anyone will care or can help them. Sometimes, they don’t want to be judged. Instinctively, most people are quick to judge, but that judgment can keep you from showing compassion, especially when it may be needed most.

We have the tendency to forget how blessed we are and that others may be going through a period of need. When we walk by a person digging through the garbage, trying to find something to eat, would you buy them something or ignore their plight? Can you imagine the difference that each of us could make if we did an act of kindness in a kind, non-judgmental way? We don’t know what we think we know about others. And we can be quick to determine the reason someone is homeless, struggling financially, quiet, withdrawn, or struggles with their academics. We don’t know if they have health issues, are dealing with a loss of a loved one, or depressed. We don’t know.

Since most of us have the inability to get into someone’s entire history and understand why, what, or when something may have happened that caused their situation, we should be without judgment. If we are going to offer our help, we should do it without condemnation. We never know the reason, season, or lessons that will come in our life and kindness offers much more than that individual may have at that moment in time. It could change or save a life. Find a way to make a difference without judgment. We owe it to ourselves to be a contributor to a kinder, more compassionate society.

The Truth About Parenting: 10 Simple Tips

family-vacation-less-stressful_47_900x600I have a passion for life! I love who I am and above all, I love God. It is God that taught me to love myself. Then, the need for others to love me didn’t exist, but I learned why it is essential for me to love others. I was apprehensive about becoming a parent. It wasn’t something that was natural for me since my childhood had a narrative that was nothing less than horrific and scarring. Once I was, the test began and the one thing I wanted to get right in life more than anything else, was parenting. As a mother, the choice became mine to submit to what I was familiar with or do something to change the lucid visions that could hurl a fragile and scared little girl into her own dark world. I was determined not to replicate the abuse and pain. I made the decision to leave it behind, taking only the good experiences and memories, although it wasn’t easy.

I remembered my painful tears as a child and promised myself that I would provide my children with the things I prayed for. I wanted them to laugh from their soul, smile because it’s their natural expression, and inspire others because they know how. It didn’t mean they would be without challenges, but I gave them unwavering love, complete trust, and confidence as tools. Then, I taught them to have compassion, persistence, goals and why a relationship with God is an essential part of their existence. Every single day, I told them I loved them and I made a constant effort to make sure they could see it. I shared the mistakes I made throughout my life so they would trust coming to me for advice when they made theirs. My children had to learn how to be fearless because as a child, I lived in fear. They needed to know it was okay if they fell as long as they got back holding their head high. They were pulled close to understand me and talk about their day just as I shared mine with them while we cooked and ate dinner together. We prayed together, laughed together, cried together and lifted one another. They both think they are my favorite because neither of them felt I loved the other more.

The truth about parenting is that you will make mistakes, as I’m sure I’ve made my share. However, learning to correct parenting skills by listening to your children and learning from them helped shape me into the mother I am today.

  1. Love them as God loves you.
  2. Encourage them to be better than you and give them the tools to accomplish that.
  3. Keep them close rather than pushing them away when you get busy. Allow them to share in your success and understand your failures.
  4. When they ask you a question, don’t lie. Tell them the truth so they learn to do the same.
  5. Take time to ask questions before jumping to conclusions.
  6. Don’t assume they know you love them because you are their parent. Tell them, and more importantly, show them.
  7. Be the example that you want them to become. They are learning from you and they see and hear more than you think.
  8. Don’t tell them about God. Show them His work and help them build a relationship with God.
  9. Try not to react or discuss situations when you’re upset. Give it time and revisit it when you have a better mindset. Allow them to share their perspective as it may change yours.
  10. Remember, you were a child once.

With Love,
Marala

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A Simple Courtesy

I often hear people say, “no one does anything for me”, which is difficult to accept when there are an abundance of blessings in front of us. Part of the problem is whether or not we chose to see them. I was walking into a store and watched a little, sandy hair boy with wide eyes struggle to hold the door open for a woman with a grocery bag and large purse in her arms. She didn’t look down and she didn’t thank him, but I’m quite sure she knew the door didn’t open itself. When I was having lunch, a gentlemen dropped his napkin on the floor and looked down, but left it there. The server came over, politely picked it up, and placed a fresh one next to his plate. The gentleman failed to look up and acknowledge him. He continued talking as if the server was invisible.

I observe these types of things more often than I see polite exchanges of appreciation. It is as though people feel entitled to courteous behavior, but fail to acknowledge it with a simple “thank you” or nod of appreciation if they are on the phone. Some type of acknowledgement is better than none.

  • The next time someone communicates with kindness, return the kindness by acknowledging it and passing the courtesy along to someone else.
  • Use the words, “thank you” more often.
  • Look someone in the eye when they are doing something for you, even if you didn’t ask for their help.
  • Because someone is serving you, doesn’t mean they are subservient or beneath your acknowledgement. We all serve someone in one way or another.

Have You Ever Taken The Fall?

I love what I do as it allows me to inspire people to see the best in themselves and invest the time and work to bring their vision to fruition. My passion evolved from my personal journey many years ago and when I cross paths with those that do the same, it feeds my soul. It takes someone who has been on an extraordinary journey to bring enlightenment and encouragement to others. By sharing their experiences, they can help those that want to begin healing, but don’t know how.

When it comes to things that lead to child abuse, bullying, substance abuse and relevant subjects that need to be addressed, Todd James Myers has done so in a powerful story based on his life, The Fall. I love taking time to observe people in their natural state because it allows me to see the truth as to who they really are. I learned more than one could imagine about Todd and how he came to fall out of one life and into another. As he was writing his story, he took me to places he lived, the bridge he took the fall from, the location where he had his spiritual awakening and the ranch that he spent months in rehab piecing his life back together. He showed me where and how people begin a life of devastation from a history of pain. Have you ever taken the fall due to painful circumstances and found it difficult to overcome? We all do. The difference is some fight to overcome it while sadly, others concede and give in.

After hearing the powerful narrative of Todd’s life, I looked into his eyes and saw a man that truly understands his mission. He’s living it and making a difference in the lives of others every single day. In working with Todd to communicate the fascinating, yet painful details of his past, I found him to be the epitome of a compassionate soul that was created by the harsh experiences, which were his reality for many years.

In reading The Fall, you will learn to understand what people internalize and how carrying painful experiences can change the path of or destroy their life. We hold on to negative emotions without realizing the damage it will do if we don’t release them and seek healing and forgiveness from God. The inspiration and message in The Fall will change you forever!

Amazon Best Seller:
The Fall by Todd James Myers
Click Here to Buy the Book on Amazon

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